TREE + LEAF

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Feeling Nostalgic: Our Roots

Drink And Draw, PLAZA DISTRICT, PRINTING, PRINTSHOP, PRODUCTSDusty GilpinComment

In 2007 we did our very first interview with the Daily Oklahoman. I'm certain to this day I cursed myself because in it I said, "It's not about the money." Bryson Panas (a co-founder of T&L) was in the college of business at OU at the time the article was published. In one of his business classes, his professor took the newspaper article and projected it in front of the class. He highlighted my quote and said, "This is bullshit."

Maybe he was right. Running a for-profit business without a regard for profit is absolutely ludicrous. For 10 years (only 7 of which we paid ourselves), I've had a salary that bounces between fast food management and first-year teacher. Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining. There are benefits of my job that no other occupation can offer. I'm just stating that the comment I made almost 10 years ago was made without much forethought. It was cultivated by the passion of a 20-year-old's arrogant ideas of social justice and moral corporate reform. It's a statement I can now look at and chuckle as I see how ambitious we were when we first kickstarted this business. It's a statement that both humbles and encourages me today.

Most creatives will tell you that they are their own worst critic. In this scenario that is most certainly true. My demons constantly remind me how a life lived otherwise would've been much more lucrative, how the events we've hosted were only temporary, how art is only profitable for a group I will never be apart. However, reason has always overcome these demons, and that statement rings true even 10 years later. Maybe, just maybe, I was right... Maybe it isn't about the money.

As we approach Tree & Leaf's 10 year anniversary, I am starting to become quite nostalgic. I've had many conversations about a decade of business and the significance is starting to hit me. I've had discussions about the sacrifices, the struggles, the future, and the financials. At the end of these conversations I have a tendency to reflect and ask myself, "Has it been worth it?"

I started digging around to find throwback photos I could post to Instagram in preparation for our anniversary party. While sifting through 10 years of files, videos, and photos, I am very much reminded that it has definitely been worth it.

I've posted many of these photos before, but I want to share with you a few that I think embody the mission of Tree & Leaf. I want to give a little context with each one, shout out a few folks, and share a few stories. Before I hop in the way-back-machine, I have to be completely sincere in offering my appreciation to YOU. Artists, musicians, print clients, blog-readers, store customers, neighboring small businesses, employees, interns, event sponsors, family, and friends: I will never be able to say it enough - THANK YOU!

These are the earliest photos of Tree & Leaf taken in September of 2006. This is our first 'printshop' in Rob Bennett's detached garage. Rob let us crash on his couch, use his bathroom, wash out our screens, and drink his beer. He never asked for anything in return. Thank you, Rob.  Pictured is Chase Kerby and Bryson Panas. Chase thought of the name Tree & Leaf, Bryson built our first website and helped with promotion and printing. Chase continued on to work with his true passion; music. Bryson left in 2009(?) to pursue a career in web/graphic design.

These are the earliest photos of Tree & Leaf taken in September of 2006. This is our first 'printshop' in Rob Bennett's detached garage. Rob let us crash on his couch, use his bathroom, wash out our screens, and drink his beer. He never asked for anything in return. Thank you, Rob.

Pictured is Chase Kerby and Bryson Panas. Chase thought of the name Tree & Leaf, Bryson built our first website and helped with promotion and printing. Chase continued on to work with his true passion; music. Bryson left in 2009(?) to pursue a career in web/graphic design.

Our first storefront location was at 8405 N. Rockwell Ave. in the back of Rockwell Plaza. We opened it on a shoestring budget in 2007. I painted my first mural in the back (it was horrible). We built canvases for local artists to paint; Erin Robinson, Kaleb Nimz, Caleb Jacks, Emma Robertson, and Jake Sloan. We had a grand opening party with performances by The Legend of Junior Sapp, Sherree Chamberlain, and Josh Roberts. It's fun to think that two of the members of The Legend of Junior Sapp (Joey Morris and Roger Eleftherakis) would go on to be our neighbors in the Plaza as co-owners of The Mule.  In our first store we also carried clothing by PS Clothing, Bombs Away, GRP FLY, Blooprint, and Dead Cities. All the clothing vendors were local, and we also began selling Montana spray paint around this time.  Kaleb Nimz was the first employee we had in this space. He was really essential in influencing my art style, and the overall direction of the shop. His emphasis on typography, graffiti, and design really influenced my print work.

Our first storefront location was at 8405 N. Rockwell Ave. in the back of Rockwell Plaza. We opened it on a shoestring budget in 2007. I painted my first mural in the back (it was horrible). We built canvases for local artists to paint; Erin Robinson, Kaleb Nimz, Caleb Jacks, Emma Robertson, and Jake Sloan. We had a grand opening party with performances by The Legend of Junior Sapp, Sherree Chamberlain, and Josh Roberts. It's fun to think that two of the members of The Legend of Junior Sapp (Joey Morris and Roger Eleftherakis) would go on to be our neighbors in the Plaza as co-owners of The Mule.

In our first store we also carried clothing by PS Clothing, Bombs Away, GRP FLY, Blooprint, and Dead Cities. All the clothing vendors were local, and we also began selling Montana spray paint around this time.

Kaleb Nimz was the first employee we had in this space. He was really essential in influencing my art style, and the overall direction of the shop. His emphasis on typography, graffiti, and design really influenced my print work.

We continued to host music events in the store. Our shows ranged from hip-hop to folk. There weren't many venues in OKC at the time and our store was just big enough to host small events. These photos are of a show hosted by Jabee Williams. The performers were 8-Bit Cynics, Jivin' Scientists, and another performer from Tucson (someone remind me...?)

We continued to host music events in the store. Our shows ranged from hip-hop to folk. There weren't many venues in OKC at the time and our store was just big enough to host small events. These photos are of a show hosted by Jabee Williams. The performers were 8-Bit Cynics, Jivin' Scientists, and another performer from Tucson (someone remind me...?)

Around that same time we started hosting an event called School of Thought. At the time it was just to try to get likeminded kids together. Anyone involved in art, breakdancing, and music was invited. This event basically spawned what is now Drink & Draw and the School of Thought emcee battles hosted by Ronnie Harris. The above video is from the very first School of Thought. My camera and editing skills were of equal quality.

Around 2010, we decided to rent and renovate one of the larger spaces next to us. In what now seems over ambitious, we made a good effort at running a music venue called The Arbor. We hosted some really great shows in that venue, and one of my favorite art shows ever called Rollin' Deep. We met a lot of cool people through the venue, but struggled to keep it booked. In 2011, a elderly woman accidentally drove her car through the wall and through our stage. We took it as an omen to close the venue! After repairing the damages, we decided to move our store and printshop into the space.

Around 2010, we decided to rent and renovate one of the larger spaces next to us. In what now seems over ambitious, we made a good effort at running a music venue called The Arbor. We hosted some really great shows in that venue, and one of my favorite art shows ever called Rollin' Deep. We met a lot of cool people through the venue, but struggled to keep it booked. In 2011, a elderly woman accidentally drove her car through the wall and through our stage. We took it as an omen to close the venue! After repairing the damages, we decided to move our store and printshop into the space.

In 2011, we opened our largest printshop/store. It was a really, really, cool space and the time we spent there was extremely productive. We expanded our printshop and purchased an automatic press. We started poster printing, we hosted more art shows, and began hosting Drink & Draw. Throughout our time in 'Suite 11' we employed probably 15 people. During this tenure we also opened our store in the Plaza in 2013 (but we'll talk about that in a minute.) We had an incredible landlord at Rockwell Plaza who was very helpful in our growth. In our naivety, we thought that would last forever. He eventually sold the property, and our lease was left in the hands of an out-of-state management company. They were non-negotiable, difficult to work with, and ultimately increased our rent. In 2015 we closed our contract printshop.  While closing our printshop was bittersweet, there was a positive side to the story. We sold our equipment to 4 of our employees; Taylor Dickerson, Ian Spencer, Phil Bearshield, and John Metcalf. Today, they still run Slate Screen & Design in Bethany, OK. Taylor and John had been employed with us for over 4 years each. It's awesome to see that 'branch' of Tree & Leaf continue on.  At this time, my longest running co-founder, John Milner, also decided to transition out of Tree & Leaf. He continues to be one of the hardest working individuals I've ever met. He handled the most stressful parts of our business, but still managed to have a lot of fun while doing it. I am very thankful for his contributions to our store and the friendship we built as business partners. I couldn't quite let go of our store in the Plaza and decided to keep it open.

In 2011, we opened our largest printshop/store. It was a really, really, cool space and the time we spent there was extremely productive. We expanded our printshop and purchased an automatic press. We started poster printing, we hosted more art shows, and began hosting Drink & Draw. Throughout our time in 'Suite 11' we employed probably 15 people. During this tenure we also opened our store in the Plaza in 2013 (but we'll talk about that in a minute.) We had an incredible landlord at Rockwell Plaza who was very helpful in our growth. In our naivety, we thought that would last forever. He eventually sold the property, and our lease was left in the hands of an out-of-state management company. They were non-negotiable, difficult to work with, and ultimately increased our rent. In 2015 we closed our contract printshop.

While closing our printshop was bittersweet, there was a positive side to the story. We sold our equipment to 4 of our employees; Taylor Dickerson, Ian Spencer, Phil Bearshield, and John Metcalf. Today, they still run Slate Screen & Design in Bethany, OK. Taylor and John had been employed with us for over 4 years each. It's awesome to see that 'branch' of Tree & Leaf continue on.

At this time, my longest running co-founder, John Milner, also decided to transition out of Tree & Leaf. He continues to be one of the hardest working individuals I've ever met. He handled the most stressful parts of our business, but still managed to have a lot of fun while doing it. I am very thankful for his contributions to our store and the friendship we built as business partners. I couldn't quite let go of our store in the Plaza and decided to keep it open.

In 2013, we opened our store in the Plaza District. Our friends at DNA Galleries were expanding into the space next door and we knew we had to jump into their old space. We had spent a lot of time in the neighborhood and knew it was a fit for us. At that time I didn't know that I would be moving into the neighborhood and marrying the Plaza District Executive Director, Kristen Vails. Fate has a fun way of dealing it's cards.  It's been 3 years since our move into the Plaza and I think it was the best business move we ever made. I have a heart for this neighborhood like no other. I love this community sometimes until it hurts. Kristen and I have invested our blood, sweat, and tears into 16th St. and I don't foresee us leaving it any time soon.

In 2013, we opened our store in the Plaza District. Our friends at DNA Galleries were expanding into the space next door and we knew we had to jump into their old space. We had spent a lot of time in the neighborhood and knew it was a fit for us. At that time I didn't know that I would be moving into the neighborhood and marrying the Plaza District Executive Director, Kristen Vails. Fate has a fun way of dealing it's cards.

It's been 3 years since our move into the Plaza and I think it was the best business move we ever made. I have a heart for this neighborhood like no other. I love this community sometimes until it hurts. Kristen and I have invested our blood, sweat, and tears into 16th St. and I don't foresee us leaving it any time soon.

The store is now fuller than ever and has a vibe that continues to support the core values we've always had; music, art, and community. At the end of the day, the products we sell are just products. I personally print all of our shirts and posters, but they are only little trinkets that represent a greater mission of cultivating creativity and community.

I'm super thankful for the staff I have now; store manager, Steven Silva, and the chump squad, Jacob Danley and Matt Hildebrand.

We'll all be ready to party on Sunday, October 9th to celebrate our 10 year anniversary. Please come hang out with us for a T&L reunion and rally for continued community growth. Please come by so I can personally thank you for your support.

Here's to 10 years and whatever the future may hold.

Dat the Intern

INTERVIEW, PRINTSHOPSteven SilvaComment
He loves it here

He loves it here

Some high school is forcing kids to gain valuable experiences by job shadowing local businesses throughout the semester. As a small business without fat stacks of cash tied up in offshore bank accounts, we're very excited about the free labor.

I sat down with Dat to ask him some questions and find out what's changed since I was in high school.

  • What's up Dat, how often will you be out here? 

Not as much as I want it to be, but from what the school gave me, about once a month. Didn't check on the date to where it ends, but it's probably soon.

  • And which school is forcing you to do this?

Haha the school "forcing" me is John Marshall High School....not as terrible as you may think.

  • Did you control your destiny or was it like one of those creepy dystopian novels where they assign you a job based on your personality?

I actually wanted to take this career path because of my love of art and video games, and no one told me what I'm supposed to do really. 

  • Just making it up as you go...Nice. What drew you to Tree & Leaf?

I'm interested in art. I have a friend that told me his brother knew a guy that worked here and I said "Perfect, I'll text him right away".

  • Expand on the type of art you like.

Most of my interest in art comes from video games, so character designs, concept art of landscapes, etc. but I also watch a lot of anime, and well, those guys are pretty cool to draw as well.

  • I heard you play soccer. I play soccer! That's amazing, we're basically the same. Any favorite teams or players?

Yes, I do play soccer, not that good please don't judge, and my favorite team would have to be Real Madrid, but my favorite player has to be Lionel Messi.

  • What's cool in high school these days?

Ummm not really much. Just studying, drama with relationships, fights (I don't get in any), and horrible lunch food really. Stuff you see in movies basically.

  • Would I be cool in high school right now?

No

  • I'm going to let that slide. Do people constantly ask you what you're going to do after graduation? 

Of course! It's one of the only questions they ask, but I always tell them that graphic designing is probably the career choice I'm aiming to do.

  • Do you ever worry that this internship will be the high point of your life, and it's all downhill from here?

Well everybody has those moments and yes I do, but I don't let that bother me because being low in my pretty life is lame and going for the top is the main priority.

Get a load of that positive attitude. We're really excited to have Dat. He's going to be working with us once a month. We'll let him take over our social media stories, and probably completely base his grade on how many likes he gets. Sorry kid, that's the real world. If you don't want to see Dat flunk out of school, tune in and let him know how he's doing!

From Point A to Point B: The Print Process

ART, PRINTING, PRINTSHOP, GRAFFITIDusty GilpinComment

I had a great response the other day when I did the Balsa Wood Glider tutorial. However, I really breezed through the print process and was more focused on the product itself. This is going to be a very detailed printing tutorial. A few little disclaimers before we begin:

- I've been printing for almost 10 years and still have a lot of learning to do. I continue to learn processes that help me in this trade. I am not advocating that anything I'm doing in this tutorial is black and white. There are many techniques and practices when it comes to printing. I totally encourage you to find methods that work with your budget, equipment, and skill level. This is just an example of my process.

- Secondly, I'm not a very good photographer but I've done my best. I tried to take a lot of pictures so I could document everything and that's likely to obliterate your browser. It might take a while to load this entire blog, hopefully it's worth it.

- Lastly, if you have any questions, just ask! It's our mission to encourage creativity, art, and the D-I-Y spirit! We would be more than happy to help you along the way. Printing is an adventure and it's one that takes a lot of practice, failure, and question-asking.

Let's do this!

Today we will be printing a run of posters. I did a quick walk through of the design process  HERE  if you want to check it out. This is our print table. We built it from scratch on a pretty low budget. If you're going to get into poster printing, I definitely recommend getting some drying racks, they keep things nice and organized.

Today we will be printing a run of posters. I did a quick walk through of the design process HERE if you want to check it out. This is our print table. We built it from scratch on a pretty low budget. If you're going to get into poster printing, I definitely recommend getting some drying racks, they keep things nice and organized.

First things first, we must emulsion our screens.  Emulsion , in a brief description, is a light sensitive latex. When you coat the mesh of a screen, the emulsion fills in all the tiny holes. When we expose the screen to light, the emulsion hardens and we create a stencil of our image. We are using a very user-friendly emulsion called Tex-P. We fill our trough and coat the screen once on both the front and back.

First things first, we must emulsion our screens. Emulsion, in a brief description, is a light sensitive latex. When you coat the mesh of a screen, the emulsion fills in all the tiny holes. When we expose the screen to light, the emulsion hardens and we create a stencil of our image. We are using a very user-friendly emulsion called Tex-P. We fill our trough and coat the screen once on both the front and back.

Since the emulsion is light sensitive, we slide the screens into our rack to dry. We've covered our rack with fabric to keep any light from sneaking in and curing our screens before we want to. Magnets and velcro do the trick in keeping the fabric 'dark room' closed.

Since the emulsion is light sensitive, we slide the screens into our rack to dry. We've covered our rack with fabric to keep any light from sneaking in and curing our screens before we want to. Magnets and velcro do the trick in keeping the fabric 'dark room' closed.

Our image is 3 colors so we've broken it down into  separations  and have had transparencies printed for each one. We have also left a  bleed,  a trapping outside stroke around each image, so that there is a little leeway for movement while printing.

Our image is 3 colors so we've broken it down into separations and have had transparencies printed for each one. We have also left a bleed, a trapping outside stroke around each image, so that there is a little leeway for movement while printing.

Our screens have dried and we are ready to expose them. Our exposure unit it simple yet effective. Two 250 watt lamps mounted above our screen and connected to an on/off switch.

Our screens have dried and we are ready to expose them. Our exposure unit it simple yet effective. Two 250 watt lamps mounted above our screen and connected to an on/off switch.

We place our transparency on top of the screen. Notice it is placed in reverse because we will be flipping the screen over and printing from the other side. I had a piece of tempered glass made that will ensure that the transparency does not move while we are exposing. We want to make sure that all the lines are nice and clean, any movement during this process can cause blured lines and inaccurate exposure.

We place our transparency on top of the screen. Notice it is placed in reverse because we will be flipping the screen over and printing from the other side. I had a piece of tempered glass made that will ensure that the transparency does not move while we are exposing. We want to make sure that all the lines are nice and clean, any movement during this process can cause blured lines and inaccurate exposure.

A simple kitchen timer will do the trick. I've set my time for 6 minutes. These times can change due to the brightness of your lights, the thickness of your emulsion, the mesh count of the screen, etc. It generally takes a little experimenting to find the time that fits your exposure system.

A simple kitchen timer will do the trick. I've set my time for 6 minutes. These times can change due to the brightness of your lights, the thickness of your emulsion, the mesh count of the screen, etc. It generally takes a little experimenting to find the time that fits your exposure system.

Lights on. Countdown from 06:00....

Lights on. Countdown from 06:00....

Done! We place the screen in our washout booth (a glorified mop sink).

Done! We place the screen in our washout booth (a glorified mop sink).

We spray the screen with water on both sides. The unexposed parts of the screen (where the film was blocking the light) begin to wash away. We really want to make sure all the unexposed emulsion gets washed out or this could dry in the screen in areas we don't want blocked out.

We spray the screen with water on both sides. The unexposed parts of the screen (where the film was blocking the light) begin to wash away. We really want to make sure all the unexposed emulsion gets washed out or this could dry in the screen in areas we don't want blocked out.

I always take my screen and hold it into the light. I trace every line with my eyes to make sure there isn't any emulsion left. I almost always find an area that needs just a little bit more washing out. Triple checking can definitely save you some time down the line.

I always take my screen and hold it into the light. I trace every line with my eyes to make sure there isn't any emulsion left. I almost always find an area that needs just a little bit more washing out. Triple checking can definitely save you some time down the line.

Here are all our screens. We've set them against the wall to allow the water to dry. As you can see, we have two different colors of screen. From left to right, we are using a 230, 156, and 230. The higher the mesh count, the more precise your image can be. The second color we will print doesn't require much detail, so we can use a lower mesh screen.

Here are all our screens. We've set them against the wall to allow the water to dry. As you can see, we have two different colors of screen. From left to right, we are using a 230, 156, and 230. The higher the mesh count, the more precise your image can be. The second color we will print doesn't require much detail, so we can use a lower mesh screen.

Once the screens have thoroughly dried, we want to block out any areas and edges that ink might be able to escape. I use basic packing tape. This might not be completely screenprinting Kosher, but it's affordable, and works well for my applications. I also tape my screens up almost all the way to the image. I've found that this makes the cleaning process so much easier. It's difficult to see in the images, but the tape covers the screen and the edges of the metal on the screen's rim.

Once the screens have thoroughly dried, we want to block out any areas and edges that ink might be able to escape. I use basic packing tape. This might not be completely screenprinting Kosher, but it's affordable, and works well for my applications. I also tape my screens up almost all the way to the image. I've found that this makes the cleaning process so much easier. It's difficult to see in the images, but the tape covers the screen and the edges of the metal on the screen's rim.

I always use my original transparency to line up my images. I've taken a scrap piece of paper and measured where I want my print placement to be. I tape the transparency to the paper and have a template to line my screen up to. I cut a scrap piece of cardstock up into tiny slices. For the sake of not having a name for these, we'll call them doodads. I take the doodads and tape them to my table tightly against the edges of the poster. I put these around every corner and edge. Now, when I'm placing the paper on the table, I know exactly where it needs to sit in order to be  registered .

I always use my original transparency to line up my images. I've taken a scrap piece of paper and measured where I want my print placement to be. I tape the transparency to the paper and have a template to line my screen up to. I cut a scrap piece of cardstock up into tiny slices. For the sake of not having a name for these, we'll call them doodads. I take the doodads and tape them to my table tightly against the edges of the poster. I put these around every corner and edge. Now, when I'm placing the paper on the table, I know exactly where it needs to sit in order to be registered.

With our paper in place, it's time to register our image. Since the screen is translucent, we line up the registration marks on the screen to the registration marks on the template. Once all four marks are exactly lined up, we tighten our screen into the clamps. These clamps are very affordable (like $10 a pair) and can be bolted into any flat surface to create a very simple printing station.

With our paper in place, it's time to register our image. Since the screen is translucent, we line up the registration marks on the screen to the registration marks on the template. Once all four marks are exactly lined up, we tighten our screen into the clamps. These clamps are very affordable (like $10 a pair) and can be bolted into any flat surface to create a very simple printing station.

The first screen we are going to print is an orange halftone gradient in the background. I'm going for a specific color, so we'll mix from scratch. Once we mix it up, we load our screen and prepare to print.

The first screen we are going to print is an orange halftone gradient in the background. I'm going for a specific color, so we'll mix from scratch. Once we mix it up, we load our screen and prepare to print.

Since we are using a water base ink, we need to keep the screen  flooded  most of the time. This keeps the ink from drying in our screen. A flood stroke is when we squeegee the ink across the screen without pushing the ink through the mesh.

Since we are using a water base ink, we need to keep the screen flooded most of the time. This keeps the ink from drying in our screen. A flood stroke is when we squeegee the ink across the screen without pushing the ink through the mesh.

We lay the screen down and pull one hard draw across the screen. We lift the screen and re-flood it. I place the poster on the rack and review it for any mistakes...

We lay the screen down and pull one hard draw across the screen. We lift the screen and re-flood it. I place the poster on the rack and review it for any mistakes...

Mistakes! I've made a few, and this won't be my last! Looks like I need to put a little more muscle into the left side of the screen while I'm pulling.

Mistakes! I've made a few, and this won't be my last! Looks like I need to put a little more muscle into the left side of the screen while I'm pulling.

Also, while I was printing, the posters were sticking to the underside of the screen. Because we are printing such a large area of ink, this is relatively common. My simple solution is to create a bit of an  off contact.  Off contact is a gap between the screen and print area. This allows us to still push down the screen but keeps it from sticking to the paper. My off contact is just a small cut of cork that will sit in the corner where the screen can rest.

Also, while I was printing, the posters were sticking to the underside of the screen. Because we are printing such a large area of ink, this is relatively common. My simple solution is to create a bit of an off contact. Off contact is a gap between the screen and print area. This allows us to still push down the screen but keeps it from sticking to the paper. My off contact is just a small cut of cork that will sit in the corner where the screen can rest.

Once I am down to my very last poster, I do one more solid pull and collect all my ink onto the squeegee. Using a spatula, I scoop it all right back into it's container to save for later.

Once I am down to my very last poster, I do one more solid pull and collect all my ink onto the squeegee. Using a spatula, I scoop it all right back into it's container to save for later.

One set down and two more to go. I won't post all the print steps for the next two, it will all be the exact same, trust me. Here is a little close up just to show the detail you can get with a 230 mesh screen, the font is about 12pt.

One set down and two more to go. I won't post all the print steps for the next two, it will all be the exact same, trust me. Here is a little close up just to show the detail you can get with a 230 mesh screen, the font is about 12pt.

I repeat all the steps for the second and third colors. The image really comes to life when the final outline color is printed. All that is left now is let them thoroughly dry so they can be signed, numbered, and stacked.

I repeat all the steps for the second and third colors. The image really comes to life when the final outline color is printed. All that is left now is let them thoroughly dry so they can be signed, numbered, and stacked.

Here are some detail shots of the print. I ended up doing 35, but pulled 5 out for mistakes. I'll be numbering 30 for sale in the store.

Here are some detail shots of the print. I ended up doing 35, but pulled 5 out for mistakes. I'll be numbering 30 for sale in the store.

This was very long winded, but I hope it answers any questions for those wanting to try printing. I've been printing for almost 10 years and think it is a wonderful job and hobby! I definitely encourage aspiring artists to give it a shot. Prints are a really great way to purchase and sell art at an affordable price.

Have any thoughts, questions, or comments? Feel free to leave us a message in the comments or on any of our social media pages! Cheers!